Belfast Exposed

Exhibitions

2nd Nov - 22nd Dec

Jerwood / Photoworks Awards (continued)

The 'Jerwood/Photoworks Award' exhibition continues into Gallery 2, where you can see the work by Sam Laughlin. On display in...

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2nd Nov - 22nd Dec

Jerwood / Photoworks Awards

Belfast Exposed is delighted to present the second Jerwood / Photoworks Awards exhibition. Following our involvement as a tou...

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Community

10th May - 10th Aug

In Full Bloom Exhibition – Experiences

The showcase of work in the Arts Care In Full Bloom Exhibitions - Experiences, exhibiting in Belfast Exposed’s Studio Galle...

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1st Apr - 24th Apr

Living in the Moment

Living in the moment is a collaboration between Belfast Exposed and a group of tenants from Mullan Mews and Sydenham Court, t...

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Portraits From A 50s Archive

Bookshop

Author

Various

Publisher

Belfast Exposed Photography

Cost

£8.00

ISBN

0-9524217-6-3

About The Book

The book, Portraits From A 50s Archive includes an essay by Kevin Bean called 'Roads Not Taken', an essay by Liam O'Ruairc called 'Out of the Albums' and a foreword by Professor Marianne Elliott, Director of the Institute of Irish Studies in Liverpool.

In 'Roads Not Taken' Kevin Bean considers how much current understanding of Northern Ireland's post war history is informed and sometimes obscured by shadows cast backward from thirty years of violent conflict. Drawing from the interview material, he looks beyond recent experience in an effort to determine how Northern Irish people lived and how they saw their future as Europe emerged from World War II. He asks, did they, for instance, share the sense of confidence which characterized Britain's 'new Elizabethan age' and found expression in movements for social reform and welfare, building, housing & road programmes, architectural innovation, scientific advances and events like the Festival of Britain? He questions whether Northern Ireland in the 1960s did indeed 'stand at the crossroads' and whether other roads - roads not taken - were possible, raising questions of contemporary relevance around issues of tradition, modernity and historical determinism.

Liam O'Ruairc's essay, 'Out of the Albums' focuses specifically on the photographs collated and produced for this project. He discusses the nature and cultural status of 'amateur' or snapshot photography, its strict conventions and tendency to focus, almost exclusively, on positive events. He asks what can we know about a time and place represented in photographs of whose private meanings we have no knowledge. He considers the new public function of these photographs, as historical evidence and asks us to think about why each picture was taken and what was left outside the frame, what is consciously forgotten as well as remembered. He also suggests that these pictures could have been taken in any Western European society during the post World War II period.